Jobs that Require Travel: 4 Jobs to Consider

Jobs that require travel also require good management. These jobs can involve regular dislocation of domestic schedules, social life and relationships. The classic example of a traveling job is in the Navy, where tours of duty can take months, and the entire domestic life of a family has to be structured on that basis. Not all jobs are that demanding, but many can involve erratic times, traveling long distances and considerable organization.

Types of traveling jobs

When looking at traveling jobs, you need to know what personal commitments are required. These are the basic types of traveling jobs:

  • Contract jobs: These jobs are well structured. The contracts spell out in detail what's involved. Times and places are specified. You can safely organize your commitments beforehand.
  • Roving commissions: Perhaps the least structured of all traveling jobs, these involve travel on an "at needs" basis. Both places of travel and times can vary considerably, although there are typical time frames. These jobs include consultancies, and regionally based jobs in both the public and private sectors. An area manager, for example, may have to travel throughout the region under their control throughout their tenure.
  • Travel nurse or staffing jobs: These jobs, provided by staffing agencies, require travel on demand to fill positions. A travel nurse, for example, may have to travel to a location for variable lengths of time, up to six months, to provide services.
  • Sales jobs: Salespeople may have to travel extensively, as a normal part of their work. Many sales jobs are statewide, national, or international, and involve considerable time away from home. Like regional based jobs, salespeople are committed to travel throughout their territories, and are also subject to travel on demand.

The pros and cons of travel jobs

Choosing travel jobs can be tricky. The pros and cons need to be explored to make sure you're getting a travel job you can manage effectively, to get the maximum advantages of the positions.

Pros:

  • Career prospects: Most traveling jobs do involve significant career possibilities and opportunities for rapid advancement.
  • Salaries and benefits: Travel jobs often have better packages, more incentives, and potentially lucrative bonuses. They also include expense accounts, and good networking opportunities.
  • Job satisfaction: Travel jobs are frequently higher profile jobs in many organizations. Responsibilities are greater than those of similar non-travel jobs. The work in these jobs receives regular recognition from management because of its importance.
  • Job quality: It's common that travel jobs involve interesting and varied work. Traveling jobs, because of their variety, don't have the "routine" element.
  • Travel can be very demanding: Many travel jobs like the Roving Commission jobs require very frequent travel. Sustained over long periods this can become a major negative factor.
  • Travel on demand can be inconvenient: The "on demand" jobs can cause unacceptable dislocation at inconvenient times.
  • Long absences may be inappropriate: For families, prolonged absences can be a severe strain on resources and relationships.
  • Jobs not up to expectations: If travel jobs don't deliver job and career satisfaction, the jobs can become counterproductive. De-motivation combined with frequent travel can force resignation.

Cons:

  • Travel can be very demanding: Many travel jobs like the Roving Commission jobs require very frequent travel. Sustained over long periods this can become a major negative factor.
  • Travel on demand can be inconvenient: The "on demand" jobs can cause unacceptable dislocation at inconvenient times.
  • Long absences may be inappropriate: For families, prolonged absences can be a severe strain on resources and relationships.
  • Jobs not up to expectations: If travel jobs don't deliver job and career satisfaction, the jobs can become counterproductive. De-motivation combined with frequent travel can force resignation.