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  1. #1

    Promotion Suprise / Salary Disappoints

    Hi,

    I need some advice. I am a programmer analyst earning $101,000. Recently in my annual review, my boss mentioned to me that he is promoting me to Lead Programmer with a $10,000 raise, so final salary would be $111,0000. All sounds good, except, I feel I am underpaid.

    I feel my current worth is $120,000. In addition, the company is incorporating my annual raise with the promotion. So its not really a 10% increase. Normally, I would get a 3% cost-of-living raise anyway which would bring my salary to $104,000. The difference between $104K and $110K is $6,000, which is only about a 5.5% promotion increase.

    My question is, how do I go about sounding appreciative of the promotion while at the same time indicating that I am not really satisfied with the pay? How would you handle this? Is management expecting me to negotiate? Would it sound ridiculous to turn down the promotion, albeit it means more money?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Expert
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
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    St. Louis, Missouri
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    I'm unsure what you should do but your pay is very high and you probably wouldn't get many other offers that are so generous. If you can't get what you want, you may try running your own programming business.
    Todd can teach you a lot about how to get a job and get more out of your career.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by db2017 View Post
    Hi,

    I need some advice. I am a programmer analyst earning $101,000. Recently in my annual review, my boss mentioned to me that he is promoting me to Lead Programmer with a $10,000 raise, so final salary would be $111,0000. All sounds good, except, I feel I am underpaid.

    I feel my current worth is $120,000. In addition, the company is incorporating my annual raise with the promotion. So its not really a 10% increase. Normally, I would get a 3% cost-of-living raise anyway which would bring my salary to $104,000. The difference between $104K and $110K is $6,000, which is only about a 5.5% promotion increase.

    My question is, how do I go about sounding appreciative of the promotion while at the same time indicating that I am not really satisfied with the pay? How would you handle this? Is management expecting me to negotiate? Would it sound ridiculous to turn down the promotion, albeit it means more money?
    I wouldn't turn down the promotion.

    I would indicate that I am very excited about the promotion. But I would like to discuss the pay.

    Then, I would negotiate it.

    Let me know if you need further help. Have a look at https://kmd-solutions.com/salary-neg...ing-in-sydney/
    https://kmd-solutions.com Job Search, Career, Salary, Pay Rise Info, Resume Samples & Tips

  4. #4
    db2017,

    I'm a Software Engineer at my full time job. Based on my experiences, your current salary is in the right ballpark, but you're correct that $120,000 is reasonable depending on your job responsibilities.

    First off, take the promotion for the coming year. Your current promotion is already set in the company's budget and your boss has already made up his mind. It's unlikely you'll get the company to change your salary after your annual review since they've already planned for it in the financial statements.

    I can't speak to your life situation, but in the grand scheme of how much money us programmers make $9,000 isn't going to change our lifestyles. If you can live with your current salary, a better way to negotiation is to focus on negotiating at your next annual review. If you want the raise immediately, then you could look for another job.

    Next, you want to get solid evidence to know if you are underpaid or not. Your salary is dependent on a number of factors such as your job responsibilities, your location, your education, and your industry. Use this article I wrote to learn if you are underpaid: http://www.climbuptheladder.com/how-...t-youre-worth/.

    If you are underpaid, then you need to set yourself up to negotiation at your next annual review. It's essentially a 3 step process:

    1. Ask your boss for more responsibility than you have now and make sure those new responsibilities are important for the company.

    2. After you are doing those new responsibilities reasonably well and about 6 months before you next annual review, you want to have a conversation with your boss. You want to tell him that "you now have different responsibilities than you did last year, and you want to let him know that you will ask for you raise at your next performance review. But you two can discuss it at the review and don't need to worry about that now." This gives him a heads up so when he works on the budget, he can factor in a raise for you. It's also better to give him advanced warning so you don't catch him off guard during your review.

    3. A month before your next annual review, practice. Use this article to prepare for the annual review (https://www.climbuptheladder.com/how...rmance-review/) and this one to prepare for the negotiation (http://www.climbuptheladder.com/they...-should-i-say/).

    I actually followed this process 2 years ago and landed a 33% raise. Just so you know this method can work for you, my salary started out below your current salary and is now higher than your desired salary. You are in a great spot to your salary to $120,000.

    Remember to be patient with your negotiations. Don't let your emotions get the best of you. Look for a win-win situation for you and your employer.

    Good luck!
    Last edited by gopivajravelu; 29th November 2017 at 10:34 PM.

  5. #5
    You can also have a look at https://kmd-solutions.com/how-to-ask-for-a-pay-raise/ And you can also contact me if you need additional help.
    https://kmd-solutions.com Job Search, Career, Salary, Pay Rise Info, Resume Samples & Tips

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by db2017 View Post
    Hi,

    I need some advice. I am a programmer analyst earning $101,000. Recently in my annual review, my boss mentioned to me that he is promoting me to Lead Programmer with a $10,000 raise, so final salary would be $111,0000. All sounds good, except, I feel I am underpaid.

    I feel my current worth is $120,000. In addition, the company is incorporating my annual raise with the promotion. So its not really a 10% increase. Normally, I would get a 3% cost-of-living raise anyway which would bring my salary to $104,000. The difference between $104K and $110K is $6,000, which is only about a 5.5% promotion increase.

    My question is, how do I go about sounding appreciative of the promotion while at the same time indicating that I am not really satisfied with the pay? How would you handle this? Is management expecting me to negotiate? Would it sound ridiculous to turn down the promotion, albeit it means more money?
    I imagine this has already been resolved but maybe my feedback can be of help to someone else who stumbles across this discussion.

    First and foremost, I am a firm believer that when starting a new position that includes a salary increase, this always opens the door to negotiations. You are earning a promotion so your leadership team knows that you are an asset and more than likely they will try to work with you. There is obviously a right and wrong way to approach this. You want to be respectful and appreciative of the fact that your manager has offered you this promotion and should start off the conversation by thanking this person. You can let your manager know that you are thrilled to advance with the company; however, you do not feel as if the compensation being offered is a true representation of the increase in responsibilities and level of work that you'll be performing. Give solid reasoning behind this. Be prepared to provide a number that you feel is fair.

    What is the worst that can happen? Maybe they can't meet your exact expectations but at the very least come back with a counter offer. Or, they say no. I don't know enough about the employer. All I know is that by not asking at all, you will never know what the outcome could have been if you decided to speak up.

  7. #7
    Junior Member New User
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Pune
    Posts
    14
    You are thinking that your company taking a long time for a raise Or the salary hike that was given to you not good that you expecting, do you think you deserve little more. In both situation, many probems to ask for a increament. Just sitting around & waiting for the boss that he will take that decision for you & one think we generally do is we look for another job but that could be a big hassle.

    Here is few tips for how to address your problem & be your own advocate for your salary raise you that deserve. Ask confidently for Salary Raise.


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