+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 21

Thread: Expected salary

  1. #1

    Expected salary

    I always have my expected salary in my CV, however, when I go for an interview, most of the time HR asking the same question, "What is your expected salary?". Does anybody know how to answer this question? Is there any implication on this question?

    Sydney, Australia

    :P

  2. #2
    Senior Member Expert
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Cheshire UK
    Posts
    165
    Personally I would never reveal my salary until asked. By mentioning it you're losing a valuable bargaining tool for a start. Also, unless it's a market rate one you could be inviting some uncomforatble questions. Any HR exec worth his or her salt would have done their research and be able to guess what you're worth so never be tempted to oversell or undersell yourself.

  3. #3
    Richard,

    Totally agree with your idea. At the beginning I didn't have " expected salary" in my CV and not telling the HR exec in regards to my expected salary during 1st interview, however the HR exec always ask me for my existing salary, frankly speaking, I don't want my current salary to be disclosed as I would like to have a slightly increased for my next move. What will you answer if HR exec ask you the same question?

    Thanks

  4. #4
    Senior Member Expert
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    269
    Never state your salary expectations in the CV...Richard is totally right, you'd be losing a powerful marketing tool. The question you are talking about is actually related to something else happening during an interview: salary negotiation, a very important step. Of course there are reasons for which hiring managers ask this question. Here are some tips on what to do when beng asked about it.

    http://www.cvtips.com/job_offer_salary_negotiation.html

  5. #5
    Senior Member Expert
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Cheshire UK
    Posts
    165
    Sandy, tell them exactly what you're earning. There's nothing to be gained from giving the wrong amount and anyway, who's to know whether they can't check amongst the HR network. They are asking you a leading question to which there are a multitude of answers but only one correct one and your response will give away a lot about you. There's a huge amount of psychology behind it. They may be looking for you to justify a higher than average salary, and you will be able to if that is genuinely your salary. That's why I would always advise answering with the truth because that's the answer easiest to explain. Do try and find out the market rates for your job and prepare your answer accordingly. Keep a clear head and don't fluster around with "I think I was underpaid" or similar because that will raise the question of arrogance. Be confident with your answers.

  6. #6
    Member Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Alice Springs, Northern Territory
    Posts
    76

    People Expect More Salary When Changing Jobs

    Telling people what your expected salary is at interview is a good way to start negotiations. I recommend you don't put your current salary in your resume or CV, but if asked, tell them. Don't forget to state your salary as a package ie, put everything into the final amount ... which is legitimate. If you get a free airfare annually, include it.

    Don't overstate it otherwise the current recruiter may find out from one of your referees, research of the company or whatever.

    Do your homework before you apply to find out what types of salaries people in the job for which you are applying get paid. Make a higher salary request than you expect. The recruiter will not pay you more than he or she thinks you are worth given the market forces. If you aim high you can go lower ... if you aim low, you can't then go higher.
    Robin Henry, People and Jobs Blog http://peopleandjobs.com.au

  7. #7
    Yes,this question is one of the most hardest and trickiest question in an interview.My advice for you is to be prepared before the job-meaning document yourself about the field salaries and the company's salaries before responnding to this question.And also be prepared to negociate if you consider the salary to be low.
    CipOlaru

  8. #8
    It is not recommended to include salary in your CV or cover letter.

    Duuring the initial interview, I do not recommend disclosing you current pay rate or salary. Delay answering this question by saying something like "I am sure we'll agree on a salary that's acceptable to both parties" or "my salary requirements are negotiable"

    If you are earning higher than their budget, they may eliminate you.

    If you are earning less than their budget, you may miss out on a higher salary.

    Let the employer decide to hire you first, then discuss salary. You will be in a much better position to negotiate a higher salary and to secure the position.

    Be prepared to negotiate.

    You may want to check: http://www.kmd-solutions.com/salary_...on_example.htm and http://www.kmd-solutions.com/Payrisetips.htm
    http://www.kmd-solutions.com Job Search, Career, Salary, Pay Rise Info, Samples & Tips
    http://www.accufabsolutions.com.au/

  9. #9
    Member Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    76
    just to add, its wise to have an indication of your market rate, you can conduct some research to find this out, and if asked... give a range of the salary you desire..this way you are playing safe.....


    CV Writing - Ola Philip King
    How to write a CV - Ola Philip King

  10. #10
    Let's say I'm interested in a lawyer vacancy job at a private law firm and they don't have the same salaries like the other firms.How will I find out how much should I ask for a salary?
    Should I ask one of the employees from there?Or should I negociate for a salary that I consider to be the wright one?
    CipOlaru

  11. #11
    Ciprian13, you can check with the Association for the particular field you are in. Not only would they have salary info, but they would have information on the supply & demand within the field, which can give you an idea of how much of a demand you are in helping you decide what salary you can ask for.
    http://www.kmd-solutions.com Job Search, Career, Salary, Pay Rise Info, Samples & Tips
    http://www.accufabsolutions.com.au/

  12. #12

    asked to state expected salary



    I m applying for a job which employer asked to state expected salary and openings with the resume, what should I include? Shall I tell the truth?

  13. #13

    help to select the career in future


    Ple guide me which way i shoul go in my career. as iom msc in computer nd Technology and doing job in sales in a automobiles Company.
    plese help.

  14. #14

    Dealing with the salary question

    Delay dealing with salary for as long as possible in the hiring process. Ideally you should only enter into a salary discussion once you have had a formal job offer and the employer is convinced of your worth. Your power to negotiate is much greater when the employer has decided you are the best candidate for the position. However be prepared to respond to the salary question in the initial interview stages by remaining as noncommittal as possible and stating a wide range. For a free guide to dealing with salary in the interview and at the job offer stage you can go to http://www.best-job-interview.com/sa...tion-tips.html

  15. #15
    I wouldn't put it on your CV as it could instantly put people off giving you an interview, before you've had a chance to prove that you are worth more than they were looking to pay.
    What Will They Ask? All you need to know to succeed at job interviews
    Find out the actual questions people have been asked at interview


  16. This ad will disappear if you login

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts