7 Things Employers Want from You

Most employers realize that the interview process is a game of elimination. And most employers realize that more than half the time they probably eliminated the wrong applicant. What makes employers search for the good employees is the savings in time and resources spent on dealing with the bad employees. So what makes a good employee? Here are seven things that a good employee does.

  • Shows up for work
  • Gets along with co-workers
  • Follows orders
  • Listens to instructions
  • Is trustworthy
  • Is a go-getter
  • Will not leave in a month

1) Shows Up for Work

During the interview the employer will look to see how reliable you are. What makes a good employee different from a potential problem employee?

  • Child Care Issues - this is not a question of if you have children, it is a question of if you have reliable childcare to keep a work schedule
  • Transportation Issues - the employer does not need to know how much of a hassle the bus system is or how bad your car trouble is; only that you will be at work on time, every time
  • Time Issues - no employer wants to feel they are second place to another job or responsibility; show that you consider the work schedule an important part of your day
  • Health Issues - the interview is not the place to discuss your recent health problems; an employer wants an employee who will not constantly call off sick or has an operation scheduled six weeks after being hired.

2) Getting Along with Co-Workers

One item an employer wants to find in a good employee is the ability to get along with the people they work with. Some signs that may have an employer wondering would include such things as:

  • Discussing problems and issues about former co-workers
  • Listing 'disagreements' with former co-workers as a reason for leaving the previous job

3) Following Orders

One of the most important items an employer will want in a good employee is the ability to follow orders and be a team member. Some signs of what does not make a good employee during an interview would be:

  • Multiple jobs within a short time span
  • Talking about 'me' issues instead of 'us' or issues important to the employer
  • Not being able, or willing, to discuss examples of team involvement at previous jobs
  • Giving the appearance of being a 'Lone Wolf'

4) Listening to Instructions

Another example of what makes a good employee is one who can listen to instructions and handle the problem. Employers look for signs of a person who has trouble in this area by noticing the following:

  • If you are late to the interview
  • If your excuse includes getting lost because of directions
  • If you can't provide meaningful answers to questions
  • If you seem focused on other things besides the interview

5) Is Trustworthy

One thing that makes a good employee is being trustworthy. Employers want to know that you will not try to take advantage of them or your job. Some issues which may cause concern, and which you need to address and reassure that positive steps have taken place to fix the problem, are:

  • Signs of addictive personality
  • Criminal complaints involving theft, forgery or false statements
  • Signs of chemical dependency
  • Signs of personal issues interfering with employment

6) Is a Go-Getter

Don't just go with the flow--take the initiative and prove that you're the right one for the job. For instance, your boss will appreciate it if you suggest new projects for your team to work on. Also, look for ways that you can improve your overall productivity and career-related skills. Don't forget: If your boss needs someone to do some extra work, step up and volunteer!

  • Propose new projects
  • Improve productivity
  • Don't shy away from extra work
  • Expand your skills

7) Will Stay with the Company

While most employers don't expect people to stay with a company for a lifetime, they do want someone who will not disappear or quit three months from being hired. What makes a good employee is the willingness to build a history with the company. Some issues which will cause concern during an interview would include:

  • Job-hopping
  • Being over qualified for the position
  • Applying for a position out of your field
  • Talking about benefits, salary and vacation days within the first half of the interview process

If you see any of these issues in yourself, you need to address them before the interview. Employers want a good employee who offers solutions and not problems.